Boston: Take the Trail

Our celebration of Independence Day started about a month early during our June visit to Boston. We first encountered the 2.5 mile brick path marking the Freedom Trail only a couple of blocks from our condo located just down the street from the Paul Revere House, so while the trail officially starts in Boston Common, we began in our Little Italy neighborhood.

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We weaved our way through the city and through our nation’s history with stops in Boston Common, the Massachusetts State House and the Robert Gould Shaw Memorial taking time to enter many of the buildings, like the Old South Meeting House and the Old State House, along the way.

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We made some mistakes on our trail trek. First, we didn’t pick up a guide. This free resource would have kept us on track and would have helped us identify all nineteen sites along the trail. Instead of sticking to the trail, we got side-tracked multiple times taking pictures, looking for restaurants and just enjoying the cool weather (low 70°s in June!).

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Over the course of our stay, we eventually visited all but one of the historical sites on the trail, only missing the Bunker Hill Monument. Fortunately, Emily and Brian enjoy cemeteries as much as I do. That meant we spent more time at the  Granary Burial Ground than any other location on the trail.

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Our history tour took us beyond the Boston city limits to Lexington and Concord, but not without a glitch. A Sunday trip using public transportation is not supported by the bus line so we found ourselves stranded over five miles from our destination. A few weeks earlier we learned to use Uber so problem solved.

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While waiting for the next bus for the Liberty Ride, we toured the Buckman Tavern where 77 Minutemen gathered awaiting the British marching from Boston.

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And before  leaving the tavern/museum, we helped settle the debate as to whether the Revolution started in Concord or Lexington. Now that we’ve voted, it’s been decided…Lexington.

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The informative narrated tour lasted about two hours and included a couple of stops along the way. It was even possible to exit the bus to explore other sites and then catch another later bus back to Buckman Tavern.

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In addition to the history along the trails, we also encountered some unusual things along the trail like this Edgar Allen Poe statue.

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Or a man with a sign, Give me a dollar not to vote for Trump. Couldn’t resist. Why hadn’t I thought of this scam to earn a little extra money?

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Boston: a great place for a walk.

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