It’s Monday. Take a Nap.

Yes, it happened again. We planned an outing for a Monday, and when we arrived, we were met by locked doors.

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That’s our car. The only one in the parking lot of the Appleton Museum. As we pulled in, I asked, “Did we do it again? Is the Appleton closed on Monday?”

A quick check of their website confirmed what we already knew. The Appleton Museum hours:

Tuesday-Saturday 10:00-5:00

Sunday 12:00-5:00

We were out of luck.

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We decided to do as the banners in the parking lot suggested: Be Inspired by the art displayed in the outdoors space.

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Connect with the whimsy of childhood memories.

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Celebrate the beautiful, sunny day.

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Create a plan for a return visit.

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To explore not only the creations made of reused water bottles.

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Or of the Fancy Free sculptures made of Crepe Myrtle and Elm saplings, but also of the more traditional artwork on display inside.

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Maybe we’ll learn our lesson. Check schedules before making plans, especially on Monday when restaurants and museums are frequently closed. In fact, you may be better off taking a nap on Mondays.

Appleton Museum…we’ll be back in the fall.

Toronto: A City of Art

As part of the Doors Open event in Toronto on Saturday and Sunday May 29th and 30th, art tours were conducted in the city. In the West Don Lands neighborhood we met our guide under the highway, below a sculpture installed in such a way as to reflect our group gathering below.

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We walked with our guides learning about the artwork as well as the history of the West Don Lands.

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A 40 meter long linear piece called Site Specific, tells the story of Thornton and Lucie Blackburn.image

Water Guardians recognizes the need to protect the community’s water. And structures like old railroad tracks and a series of interlocking light posts from throughout Toronto’s history have been transformed as pieces of art.

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I especially liked Peeled Pavement as it truly looks like an exposed layer of the sidewalk with the tools of the past exposed. It cleverly serves as a bench as well. This public art project brings great pride to the Toronto waterfront.image

We also took a self-guided tour in the Village of Islington with over two dozen murals depicting the town’s history. From the building of the Methodist Church and the role of the Circuit Riders:

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to a class picture on the side of a building.

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A residence painted so that it appears that John, the photographer, is part of the scene.

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Lots of murals of residents participating in recreational activities.

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And others illustrating transportation.

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One representing recovery after a hurricane and another recounting a football game stormed by eager fans trying to collect coupons dropped on the field.

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Our expressions mimic the somber ones of Islington’s founding families.

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The art in the West Don Lands and the Village of Islington are by no means the only public art to be found in Toronto. Many statues can be seen throughout the city. Toronto really is a great place to take an Art Walk.

Tips:

 

Murals of Islington Self Tour – Download the map. Follow the path. Information about each mural is on the building next to each mural.

Art Gallery of Ontario – Admission $19.50 (Canadian, about $15.50 US)
Monday CLOSED
Tuesday 10:30 am – 5 pm
Wednesday 10:30 am – 9 pm
Thursday 10:30 am – 5 pm
Friday 10:30 am – 9 pm
Saturday 10:30 am – 5:30 pm
Sunday 10:30 am – 5:30 pm

Museum of Contemporary Art – opens May 2, 2017

Art & Performance Tour on Saturdays 10:00-12:00 and a Culture and Campus Tour on Sundays 1:30-3:30 – Led by Toronto Society of Architects; They also offer a Tower Tour Saturdays 1:30-3:30; Tickets to all tours are $10 (Canadian about $7.75 US) and require advance registration.

Tour Guys – Free Walking Tours in Toronto including a Downtown Tour, Old Town Toronto History Tour, Food Tour at St. Lawrence Market and a Graffiti Tour While these are called Free Walking Tours, they aren’t really free, but instead participants are expected to tip your guide “whatever they think the tour is worth”, usually between $15-$20. (We couldn’t take advantage of these tours because none are scheduled on Monday, the only day we had sufficient time for a tour.)

 

 

 

 

TBT: A Sculpture of Love and Anguish

Today, in honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day, I’m reposting our visit to the Holocaust Memorial in Miami Beach which we visited in June 2013.

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A Sculpture of Love and Anguish

The Holocaust Memorial located in Miami Beach leads visitors through a series of exhibits providing an emotional and detailed history of Holocaust events. The center piece of the memorial, A Sculpture of Love and Anguish, is a dramatic bronze sculpture of a 42-foot arm stretching toward the sky in a plea for remembrance. An Auschwitz number on the outstretched arm on which 130 human figures cling provides a powerful image.

In addition to the central sculpture, a series of smaller sculptures depicting figures in anguish surround the arm reaching toward heaven. The Garden of Meditation and the Arbor of History with panels documenting historical events, the Wall of Memory, and the Lonely Path provide reminders of the fate of more than six million victims of the Holocaust.

This was not a scheduled part of our trip to Miami, but we made a U-turn after passing the memorial so we could get a closer look. The memorial is located only blocks from South Beach between 1933-1945 Meridian Avenue, and it’s certainly worth a visit.

Mural City

A couple years ago I discovered the murals painted in downtown Palatka. Then on a recent trip to look up some property records, I realized there were murals I missed.

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Located throughout downtown, the murals represent the history of Palatka, a place known as the “Gem City of the St. John’s River.”

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Palatka’s history and cultural identity is illustrated on the sides of buildings tracing events from as early as the city’s founding in 1821.

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I especially admired the large peace sign collage tucked in an alley just barely visible from the main road.

Messages of rememberance and love formed the larger work of art giving it special meaning.

Click here for more information on the murals and then go see them in person.

 

Bike Art

Parked in front of the Tax Collector’s Office in Palatka, I noticed a painted bike with flowers in the basket across the street so I jumped out of the car to get a better look.

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As I turned to go back to the car I saw another bike down the street so of course I decided to investigate further.

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Across the street, a blue bike with a basket full of flowers. And further down, more bikes.

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I had gone down a rabbit hole looking for the brightly painted bicycle planters adding a little fun to downtown Palatka.

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Several children’s bikes and tricycles were included in the bike art.

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There were even a few that looked like they were still works in progress, either lacking plants or paint.

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Finally I came across an interesting bike rack with a boldly painted message:

Bike Palatka

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This is a city ready to embrace the Palatka-Lake Butler Trail under development as well as the Palatka-St. Augustine Trail. Or maybe they’re just preparing for the upcoming Palatka Bicycle Festival on April 9-10. In any case, the bikes got my attention.

Chihuly and the Hot Shop

For quite some time I’ve wanted to go to the Morean Arts Center in St. Petersburg to see the work of Dale Chihuly on permanent display at the center, and finally, last month we took a daycation to Pinellas County which included a visit to The Collection.

Pieces included the Basket Wall

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Chandeliers, including the Ruby Red Icicle Chandelier

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the Persian Ceiling

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Blue Neon Tumbleweed and Macchia Forest

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the glass garden curlicues, Milli Fiori

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and the Cullet Wall which plays with the sunlight filtered through the glass rocks.

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Docent led tours are available daily. However, we wandered through the Chihuly museum on our own.

As much as I enjoyed The Collection, the highlight of the day was the glass blowing demonstration at The Hot Shop. The $19.95 combination ticket provided admission to the Morean Galleries, the Center for Clay, the Chihuly Collection as well as the Glass Studio and Hot Shop.

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After touring the Glass Shop, we watched glassmakers create original pieces while explaining the process. The fifty minute demonstration was fascinating as the original glowing ball transformed into a vase.

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According to the Glass Studio and Hot Shop website, The Hot Shop Personal Glass Experience provides a 30-minute one-on-one session so guests can work with a glassblower to create their own glass art to take home.

I don’t think I could create something even with the assistance of a glassblowing professional. It’s hard work, and I’m not excited about handling red hot materials.

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What a great bonus to be able to watch these artists at work!

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